B.1 Community engagement

ACT Health recognises that building an effective healthcare system requires genuine collaboration between consumers, carers and ACT Health staff. ACT Health is committed to providing opportunities for consumers and carers, those who are most affected by healthcare services, to influence the development, delivery and review of services. Increasing the participation of consumers and carers in health care is fundamental to building a strong partnership. ACT Health services will be able to provide higher quality care as a result of meaningful consumer and carer involvement in policy development and planning of health services.

The ACT Health Consumer and Carer Participation Framework aims to assist consumers, carers and ACT Health staff to work in genuine collaboration in order to:

  • increase consumer and carer participation in health care
  • facilitate joint decision making at all levels
  • improve the development, delivery and evaluation of ACT’s public health services.
  • Opportunities for consumer participation within the health system exist at many levels and at many points within the continuum of care and delivery of services. These include but are not limited to participation at:
  • the level of individual care, where there are interactions between the consumer, patient and/or carer and the healthcare providers
  • the service level, where consumer and carer participation is focused on contributing to service delivery guidelines and procedures
  • the organisational level, where the level of participation is focused on broader strategic and policy development activity.

ACT Health already has in place an extensive range of established practices and initiatives that demonstrate its ongoing commitment to consumer and carer participation. Examples of these include:

  • Listening and Learning: Consumer Feedback Policy and Standards
  • implementation of the Australian Charter of Healthcare Rights and Charter on the Rights of Children and Young People in Healthcare Services in Australia
  • Consumer, Carer and Community Representative program and Reimbursement Policy
  • relationships with consumer advocacy agencies through service funding agreements
  • Respecting Patient’s Choices
  • Patient and Family Centred Care Framework.

ACT Health has actively engaged with the community on a range of matters, as indicated in the following table:

 

Line area Project Consultation process
(tools used)
Groups/individuals consulted Approximate
number consulted
Outcome
Policy and Government Relations Branch
Chronic and Primary Health
Policy Unit
Development of a new Chronic Conditions Strategy 6-week community consultation on draft Strategy in Oct./Nov. 2012. Feedback could be provided: · via an online questionnaire
(Survey Monkey) · by attending a public forum on
16 Oct. 2012 · by email or by postal mail. Director-General bulletin to
ACT Health staff. Stakeholders could email
consultant directly. Face-to-face meetings also occurred.
Health Care Consumers’ Association (HCCA), ACT Medicare Local, NGOs who support people with chronic conditions, medical, nursing and allied health clinicians, other
ACT Health staff. Members of the Primary Health and Chronic Disease Strategy Steering Committee, the Local Hospital
Network Council.
50 Finalisation of ACT Chronic Conditions Strategy—Improving Care and Support 2013–2018.
Chronic and Primary Health Policy Unit Development
of a new Palliative Care Services Plan
Face-to-face meetings held
with key external organisations
and groups. A draft Plan was submitted to a six week public consultation period from 26 Oct.–6 Dec. 2012; advertised in the Canberra Times, the Time to Talk website, the
ACT Health Staff Bulletin and through emails to identified stakeholders. A further public forum was held on 21 Nov. 2012.
Key stakeholders, Calvary Health Care, Clare Holland House, Palliative Care ACT, key clinicians (multidisciplinary), consumers, (including Health Care Consumers Association), ACT Medicare Local, the Local Hospital Network Council and members of the ACT Palliative Care Strategy Steering Committee. 40  

 

 

Line area Project Consultation process
(tools used)
Groups/individuals consulted Approximate
number consulted
Outcome
Policy and Government Relations Branch
Chronic and Primary Health
Policy Unit
Secretariat support of the ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Sexual Health, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C and Related Diseases (SHAHRD) The ACT Ministerial Advisory Council on Sexual Health, HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C and Related Diseases (SHAHRD) provides advice to the ACT Minister for Health from community and consumer perspectives on issues related to health and wellbeing in the areas of sexual health and blood-borne diseases. SHAHRD likewise advises on the implementation of HIV/AIDS, Hepatitis C and Sexually Transmissible Infections:
A Strategic Framework for the ACT 2007–2012. SHAHRD held a community consultation forum on the Future of HIV Prevention in the ACT, in May 2013.
Membership specifically includes individuals recruited for their experience, expertise and connection with relevant communities of interest. This approach values the participation of community organisations, affected communities and clinical communities in producing optimal health outcomes, and is based on a commitment to consultation and joint decision making. 10 members Approximately 35 people attended. Ongoing input into policy and strategic directions for sexual health and blood-borne virus issues in the ACT.
Mental Health
Policy Unit
Mental Health Promotion Prevention and Early Intervention (PPEI) Working Group The evaluation and implementation working group oversees the implementation and evaluation of Building a Strong Foundation:A Framework for Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing in the ACT 2009–2014. The evaluation and implementation working group met three times in 2012‑13 with representation from the Mental Health Consumer Network, Mental Illness Education ACT, Carers ACT, the Women’s Centre for Health Matters, ACT Health, ACT Education and Training Directorate, Justice and Community Safety Directorate, Community Services Directorate, Territory and Municipal Services Directorate. There were four meetings with
ten participants.
Ongoing implementation and evaluation of Building a Strong Foundation:A framework for Promoting Mental Health and Wellbeing in the ACT 2009–2014. Evaluation of the 2011‑12
activities conducted.
Mental Health
Policy Unit
ACT Suicide Prevention Implementation and Evaluation Working Group (SPIEWG) The evaluation and implementation working group continues to oversee
the implementation and evaluation of Managing the Risk of Suicide:
A Suicide Prevention Strategy for the ACT 2009–2014.
The evaluation and implementation working group was scheduled to meet bi-monthly with representation from ACT Medicare Local, Lifeline Canberra, Menslink, OzHelp Foundation, Carers ACT, Supportlink, Mental Health Consumer Network, Mental Health ACT, Education and Training Directorate, and Justice and Community Safety Directorate (JACSD), ACT Policing. There were four meetings
with an average of eight participants per meeting.
Ongoing implementation and evaluation of Managing the Risk of Suicide:
A Suicide Prevention Strategy for the ACT 2009–2014. Implementation of the Men’s Suicide Prevention Conference, Let’s Talk for Suicide Prevention and evaluation of the 2011‑12 activities conducted.
Policy and Government Relations Branch
Mental Health Policy Review of the ACT Mental Health (Treatment and Care) Act 1994 Two exposure drafts released for six weeks’ community consultation August 2012, April 2013. Community consultation meetings with stakeholder groups and broader community. Working groups with stakeholder membership developing recommendations for change. Broad stakeholder membership
of review advisory group
(over 40 groups including consumers and carers and human rights representatives).
Mental health consumers; mental health carers; disability consumers and carers advocacy groups; community agencies; Legal Aid; Human Rights Commission; government departments; health academics; clinicians; courts;
Corrections; police; Public Advocate; Victims of Crime Commission; Ambulance Service; Official Visitors.
500 Consensus achieved on all amendments to the Act
Alcohol and Other Drug
Policy Unit
Strategic Framework for the Management of Blood Borne Viruses in the Alexander Maconochie Centre In August 2012 the draft Strategic Framework for the Management of Blood Borne Viruses in the Alexander Maconochie Centre (AMC) was publicly released. The targeted and public consultation period closed in Oct. 2012. The majority of responses received supported the Framework and the implementation of regulated equipment exchange in AMC. Submissions from the consultation, except in cases where permission to do so was not received, were published on the ACT Health website in mid-Jan. 2013. Members of the public. Members of the AMC Health Policy and Services Advisory Committee including the Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drug Association of the ACT (ATODA), the Mental Health Community Coalition and consumer representatives. 47 submissions were received. The draft framework was amended to address relevant feedback and the framework is currently being considered by the ACT Government.
Alcohol and Other Drug
Policy Unit
Staff and union consultation regarding implementation of regulated equipment exchange in AMC The JACSD and ACT Health established a Joint Directorate Consultative Committee. Membership of this committee includes representatives from the Community and Public Sector Union (CPSU), Health Services Union (HSU), Australian Salaried Medical Officers Association and the Australian Nursing Federation. The Committee initially met in
September 2012. Face-to-face staff consultations commenced in June 2013.
Unions and staff. Face-to-face consultations with staff commenced in June 2013. Consultations are not complete.

 

 

Line area Project Consultation process
(tools used)
Groups/individuals consulted Approximate
number consulted
Outcome
Policy and Government Relations Branch
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Health Unit
ACT Health Reconciliation Action Plan 2012–2015 Consultations with the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities included distributing a draft Reconciliation Action Plan 2012–2015 to key stakeholders and community-controlled organisations. A community workshop was held to present the action plan and the specific actions. Comments received were considered for inclusion in the final draft action plan. A formal launch of the action
plan was held and involved community representatives. The final action plan was distributed to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander community organisations and individuals.
ACT Health’s Reconciliation Action Plan Working Group includes representation from:the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait
Islander Elected Body, United Ngunnawal Elders Council, ACT Torres Strait Islanders Corporation, Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service and clients of the hospital system. Members of the working
group were involved in the community workshop.
Ongoing consultations with
over 20 Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander organisations
and individuals.
To meet ACT Health’s commitment to Reconciliation and improving health outcomes for Aboriginal
and Torres Strait Islander peoples
of the ACT.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Health Unit
Antenatal care,
pre-pregnancy and teenage sexual and reproductive health (Element 2 of the Council of Australian Governments Indigenous Early Childhood Development National Partnership Agreement)
High level consultation was progressed through the Advisory Group which includes representation from the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Project officers consulted individually with government and non-government organisations and key stakeholders within the local Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities. Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service, Gugan Gulwan Youth Aboriginal Corporation, West Belconnen Child
and Family Services, The Junction Youth Health Service, Sexual Health and Family Planning ACT (SHFPACT), Indigenous Social Inclusion Company, Police Citizens Youth Club, Indigenous Student Support Unit through the Education Directorate, Education Directorate, Bimberi Youth Justice Centre, Medicare Local, Marymead.
Fourteen members make up the Advisory Group. More than 50 organisations and individuals have been consulted to date and this is ongoing. More than 100 students have participated in Core of Life sessions. Approximately 16 pregnant Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women attended antenatal Core of Life sessions. Three Core of Life Facilitator Training Workshops were conducted for 58 participants. 13 Core of Life education programs for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander youth occurred both in schools and the community sector. A breastfeeding DVD
‘Give it a go’ and two booklets Health in pregnancy and sexual health have been developed for young people.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
Health Unit
ACT Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Action Plan 2013–2018 Consultation and engagement
with the Aboriginal and Torres
Strait Islander communities included distributing to key stakeholders a draft workforce action plan for comment.
The draft workforce action plan was provided to:the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Forum that includes representation from the Commonwealth Department of Health and Ageing, the ACT Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Elected Body, ACT Medicare Local and Winnunga Nimmityjah Aboriginal Health Service. Members of the ACT Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Support Network were also consulted on the workforce action plan. Consultations involved 7 representative groups that
included Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander members.
The ACT Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Action Plan 2013–2018, which intends to increase the numbers of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people employed in ACT Health and the healthcare sector to improve healthcare service delivery.
Rehabilitation, Aged and Community Care
Community
Care Program
HIP Gungahlin Community Health Centre opening Community Open Day—marketing in community magazines, Canberra Times etc. Participation, involvement, community feedback. Legislative Assembly members, community groups, ACT general public, Canberra Hospital and Health Services staff. Community
Open Day—participation, involvement, community feedback, focus groups.
Approximately 300 visited the Health Centre. Marketing to 1000s of the general public. Successful marketing of services available at Gungahlin
Community Health Centre and other CH&HS sites. Referral to services. Very positive consumer feedback. Two successful community engagement sessions at Gungahlin Market Place. Many brochures handed out. Many questions about ACTH community services answered.
Community-
based services
Seniors Expo Face-to-face at Natex, marketing
via public magazines.
Seniors. 100s A large number of people attended the expo and visited stalls.
Community
Care Program
Arthritis Expo Face-to-face at Uniting Care Kippax, marketing via public magazines. People who have arthritis. 20 people stopped at the stall. Independent Living Centre brochures were provided to the community.
Community
Care Program
Lung Foundation Expo Face-to-face at Southern Cross Club, marketing via public magazines,
TV, etc.
People with respiratory disease and their carers. 20 Raised community awareness of the Independent Living Centre.
Rehabilitation services 12B discussion group Face-to-face. Families and carers on 12B. 11 Information on Independent Living Centre provided to the community.
Community
Care Program
Evaluation of Footsure meeting—culturally
and linguistically diverse
(CALD) needs
Survey to CALD group leaders. Carers ACT CALD groups. 5 Feedback on appropriateness
of Footsure sessions for
CALD groups.
Office of the Allied Health Advisor
Office of the Allied Health Advisor (AHA) Review of the Orthoptics Workforce Project Face-to-face, semi-structured interviews, focus groups, literature review of
available evidence.
ACT Health key stakeholders, including Allied Health Professionals (orthoptists), consultant ophthalmologists, Visiting Medical Officers (VMO), ophthalmologists, nursing staff, Workforce Policy and Planning, community members, union representative, professional association representatives, tertiary education sector. 10 All submissions, feedback and evidence collated during the consultation phase will be considered for inclusion in the final evidence-based report, which will make recommendations to develop the orthoptics workforce.

 

 

Line area Project Consultation process
(tools used)
Groups/individuals consulted Approximate
number consulted
Outcome
People Strategy and Services Branch
Workforce Policy and Planning Unit Develop Health Workforce Plan 2013–2018 (ACT) Presence on ACT Health website. Targeted emails to key stakeholders seeking input. Discussion paper and
Workforce Plan published on
ACT Health website. 2 face-to-face information sessions held in Woden and Belconnen for external stakeholders.
All Unions representing ACT Health employees and stakeholders across health, tertiary education, NGOs and community representatives. Invitation to attend
face-to-face information sessions regarding the Workforce Plan Discussion Paper sent to approximately
66 stakeholder groups. Workforce Plan draft sent
to the 13 Unions on the
ACT Health Union contact
list as well as extensive
internal circulation.
Informing the final version of the Workforce Plan. Written submissions received from the Australian Nursing Federation. 6 stakeholders attended the face-to-face information sessions.
Workforce Policy and Planning Unit Decision whether to introduce the Physician Assistant role in the ACT. Direct stakeholder emails and
a face-to-face session for stakeholders.
Senior medical and nursing stakeholders in the ACT Public Sector, Unions, tertiary
education representatives, Medicare Local and some interstate educational stakeholders.
17 representatives Paper developed regarding the potential for introducing the Physician Assistant role in the ACT. No clear need identified for this role at this stage. This may be reviewed at a later stage.