Healthy holidays

The culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities of the ACT celebrate many different cultural and religious events. This page is designed to give people from CALD backgrounds information about how they can stay healthy during special holidays and other events, and to help health care providers support their CALD patients during these times.

Diwali

Diwali (also known as Deepavali) is an important five-day Hindu festival known as “the festival of lights.” In 2015, the main celebrations for Diwali take place on Wednesday 11 November. Diwali is celebrated with fireworks, decoration with candles and other lights, spending time with family, and rich foods, especially sweets (known as mithai).

The rich and sweet foods traditionally eaten during Diwali time may affect diabetes management. Patients may require guidance on how to best manage their diabetes during this period.

Health professionals should also be aware that burn injuries from candles, sparklers or other flames may occur during this time.

See the following resources for advice on staying healthy and safe during Diwali:

Healthy Diwali: A guide for health professionals

Healthy Diwali: A guide for community members

Diabetes management during Ramadan

Ramadan is an important month-long event for Muslim people around the world. In 2015, Ramadan will begin in mid June. During the month of Ramadan, many Muslims fast (i.e., abstain from food, water, smoking and taking medicine) from sunrise to sunset. Fasting may affect the management of several health conditions, including diabetes.

Before Ramadan begins, people with diabetes are encouraged to speak to their usual health professional/s about their fasting practices during Ramadan and any changes to medicine doses, diet and/or physical activity that should be made to best manage their diabetes.

Health professionals should learn about how their Muslim patients observe Ramadan, and be able to offer guidance on how to best manage diabetes, and other health conditions, during this period. Patients may see fasting as an important religious and spiritual duty, and this issue should be treated with respect and sensitivity.

The Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) provides interpreting services in over 160 languages.  Interpreters are available on-site or via telephone by phoning 131 450.

Download:

Managing diabetes during Ramadan – a guide for health professionals

Managing diabetes during Ramadan – a guide for people with diabetes

Diabetes management during Yom Kippur

Yom Kippur is an important holiday observed by Jewish people around the world. In 2015, Yom Kippur falls on Wednesday 23 September (Note: Jewish holidays begin at sundown the day before the date of the holiday).

During Yom Kippur, many Jewish people fast (i.e., abstain from food, water and non-essential medicines) from before sunset on the day before Yom Kippur, to after sunset on the day of Yom Kippur. The fasting period lasts approximately 25 hours. Fasting may affect the management of several health conditions, including diabetes.

Before Yom Kippur begins, people with diabetes are encouraged to speak to their usual health professional/s about their fasting practices during Yom Kippur and any changes to medicine doses, diet and/or physical activity that should be made to best manage their diabetes.

Health professionals should learn about how their Jewish patients observe Yom Kippur, and be able to offer guidance on how to best manage diabetes, and other health conditions, during this holiday. Patients may see fasting as an important religious and spiritual duty, and this issue should be treated with respect and sensitivity.

The Translating and Interpreting Service (TIS) provides interpreting services in over 160 languages.  Interpreters are available on-site or via telephone by phoning 131 450.

Download:

Managing diabetes during Yom Kippur – a guide for health professionals

Managing diabetes during Yom Kippur – a guide for people with diabetes