B.8 - Human Resources Management

Introduction/overview

ACT Health has a dispersed model for human resources management with many areas sharing responsibility for staff-related issues. Business units are responsible for deciding their workforce composition below the executive level. They make their own recruitment decisions and undertake day-to-day management duties. People Strategy and Services Branch (PSSB) assists business units with their human resources functions, especially in complex or difficult cases. The most common areas where this occurs are:

  • where allegations of misconduct have been made
  • team interventions are required to address specific workplace culture issues
  • advice on public sector employment obligations is needed
  • it is difficult to recruit staff with particular skills or qualifications.

PSSB is also responsible for whole of directorate and/or strategic human resources issues, such as:

  • providing general clinical and leadership training
  • conducting enterprise bargaining negotiations
  • conducting high-level workforce planning and directorate-wide people policy.

The Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate (CMTEDD) provides whole-of-service human resources policy, strategy and programs. It:

  • sets targets for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders and People with Disability
  • authorises the employment of executives
  • provides transactional human resources services through its Shared Services centre.

All powers in relation to the appointment, engagement and employment of staff are exercised on delegation from the Head of Service or the Director-General of ACT Health.

Human resource management

The organisation’s workforce profile reflects the increased health workforce that is required for the growing organisation, including:

  • implementing new and extended services in the community sector of the ACT
  • meeting ongoing service delivery growth within the hospital.

To ensure that the services provided by ACT Health reflect best practice in national/international services the models of care for clinical areas are regularly reviewed. ACT Health is engaged in the national health workforce committees, including the:

  • Australian Health Workforce Ministerial Advisory Council (AHWMC)
  • Health Workforce Principal Committee (HWPC).

This ensures that the organisation is aligned to the National Agenda for health workforce policy and planning.

Workforce planning

The aim of ACT Health workforce planning is to ensure that the right person, with the right skills is in the right place at the right time to provide the right services within budget.

Workforce planning guides the recruitment, retention and development of ACT Health’s diverse clinical and non-clinical workforce. Workforce projections are developed using contemporary methodologies, and gap analysis provides a guide to the recruitment needs of the organisation. ACT Health’s largest recurrent expense is the cost of employees, with approximately 80 per cent of recurrent funds being spent on workforce.

The ACT Health Workforce Plan 2013–2018 identifies the following five focus areas:

  • Health Workforce Reform
  • Health Workforce Development
  • Health Workforce Leadership
  • Health Workforce Planning
  • Health Workforce Policy.

The organisation is tracking well against all focus areas, with demonstrated collaboration between strategic and operational areas of the organisation to implement and evaluate the changes.

The organisation is one of the largest employers in the ACT and we need to ensure that people with the right skill sets are recruited.

To keep ACT Health facilities and services operating efficiently and effectively we need:

  • doctors, nurses and allied health personnel
  • administrative, technical and support workers.

Using targeted recruitment strategies and collaborating with local tertiary education facilities to grow our own health workforce has been a successful approach.

The first biannual ACT Health Workforce Summit ‘Leading workforce risk mitigation initiatives’ was held on 12 March 2015. Executive Directors from across ACT Health discussed workforce planning as a tool for workforce leaders and attended a workshop focused on key challenges and risks.

The strategic management of the workforce was identified as one of the greatest challenges for workforce leaders for the next decade. The group found that ACT Health is required to:

  • maximise the flexibility of the workforce
  • minimise workforce risks
  • constantly develop skills to remain abreast of ongoing changes, while retaining valuable skills.

The group then focused on identifying strategies to:

  • mitigate the risks and support the workforce to deliver on required outcomes
  • help the organisation overcome workforce challenges.

Retention strategies

Recruitment and retention strategies are being implemented to ensure that we have a workforce into the future with the organisational knowledge, skills and capability to provide health services of the highest standard.

ACT Health’s exit rate was 7.1 per cent, which is less than the national average. Recommendations made in Exit Survey Reports indicate we need to increase the focus on working conditions and staff support measures, including:

  • supporting flexible work arrangements
  • strengthening the options for part-time or casual re-employment of retired and retiring staff members.

Learning and development opportunities are provided to staff in accordance with the Essential Education Policy. Continuing professional development opportunities for staff include:

  • development of health professional networks across ACT Health
  • discipline-specific professional development
  • clinical supervision workshops for supervisors.

Workplace culture and engagement continue to be an area of priority for ACT Health, given the strong correlation with retention and overall performance. An effective internal consultancy service for managers/teams enabled effective analysis of workplace culture issues and targeted strategies, which took into account the unique factors of each team. In 2014–15, 48 teams from across the organisation received this targeted assistance, with good improvement outcomes.

ACT Health offers retired employees opportunities to re-enter the workforce in a part-time or casual capacity. Opportunities that allow early retired employees to return in roles that are less physically demanding have been explored.

ACT Health has been accepted into the 2014–15 Commonwealth Department of Employment Corporate Champions Program, which supports the development and implementation of strategies to retain workers aged 45 or over. A work plan has been approved for the rollout of the Corporate Champions program and implementation has commenced.

Employment strategies

ACT Health offers a range of competitive incentives to ensure it is a desirable place of employment for clinical and non-clinical professionals. Ongoing professional development to both cohorts of staff is offered through a range of avenues including:

  • internal and external training
  • targeted employment projects
  • through the performance development plans.

ACT Health has worked strategically with the ANU and other approved higher education institutions to ensure medical students are provided with the relevant support to perform their duties while also undertaking further professional development or targeted placements for junior medical staff.

In June 2014, an Employment Inclusion Manager was permanently engaged to undertake initiatives and provide support and assistance within ACT Health to increase the number of employees that have a disability or are Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander.

A large part of the inclusion work has focused on assisting, educating and developing staff and managers on the employment inclusion area for people with a disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people. This has involved meeting with areas to discuss inclusion placements and then providing support for staff and management once a placement has been undertaken.

To increase staff awareness regarding employment inclusion, two separate monthly inclusion seminars have been conducted. The presentation topics included:

  • Disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Employment and training ideas, benefits and opportunities
  • the support and funding available to managers.

In April 2015, ACT Health began an Employment Inclusion partnership with Chief Minister, Treasury and Economic Development Directorate (CMTEDD). The partnership will focus on the Disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Employment Inclusion initiatives to be undertaken to increase the number of inclusion staff across all directorates.

The ACT Health and CMTEDD partnership on inclusion employment initiatives commenced in 2015. As part of this, monthly ACT Health Inclusion Seminars and presentations have been opened up to all ACT Government directorates. In June 2015, the Head of Service invited representatives from the directorates to attend the inclusion seminar held on 30 June 2015. This invitation is one of the first steps to establishing a whole-of-ACT Government Inclusion Practitioners network.

A panel of Disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employment providers was established through the Employment Inclusion Manager, which aims to:

  • seek people who are available for work with ACT Health
  • provide support, advice and possible funding towards workplace modifications, adjustments and support.

The Disability Employment Providers, through the Employment Inclusion Manager, also provide assistance, support, education and training to the supervisors and work colleagues in the workplace.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

The ACT Health Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health Workforce Action Plan 2013–2018 (Workforce Action Plan) sits under the organisation’s Workforce Plan 2013–2018 (Health Workforce Plan).

During 2014–15, the Reconciliation Action Plan (RAP) Committee was established. It consists of ACT Health representatives. The committee, in consultation with Reconciliation Australia and the ACT Elected Body and Community:

  • reviewed the second RAP 2012–15
  • created the new third ACT Health RAP for the period covering 2015–18.

Managers are encouraged to use the enterprise agreement's flexible working arrangements, where appropriate, to achieve a healthy balance between operational needs and work-life balance. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander employees are provided with details of their entitlements to attend culturally significant events.

People with a Disability

During 2014–15, the Disability Employment Action Plan Committee was established. It consists of representatives from across ACT Health and consulted with other ACT Government directorates, including the:

  • ACT Human Rights Commission
  • Australian Network on Disability
  • Commonwealth Human Rights office.

The committee was responsible for the creating and establishing ACT Health’s first Disability Employment Action Plan. The ACT Health Disability Employment Action Plan 2015-2018 was released in January 2015 and is registered with the Commonwealth Human Rights Office.

Apprenticeships

In 2013, ACT Health commenced its first inclusion Australian School-Based Apprentice (ASBA), which is an Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Apprentice. During 2014–15, ACT Health increased this number to six Inclusion ASBAs, with three being Disability and three being Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

The ASBA Program has been very successful and we will be working towards increasing these numbers in the upcoming financial year.

Traineeships

In 2015, ACT Health started an Employment Inclusion partnership with CMTEDD. It will focus on the Disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Employment Inclusion initiatives to be undertaken to increase the number of inclusion staff across all directorates. This has included involving the:

  • 2016 Graduate Program
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Traineeship, which  commenced in August 2015.

Future traineeships will include a disability placement traineeship, cadetships and other development programs.

Learning and development programs

In 2014–15, participation in learning and development increased. This satisfied the quality improvements for health accreditation education requirements, as outlined in the National Safety and Quality Service Standards. This is reflected in an increase in e-learning completions, which doubled from the previous year. Some face-to-face programs now use a blended approach or were replaced by e-learning programs. This has provided a more flexible and cost effective delivery that meets the needs of the workforce.

ACT Health implements governance strategies to ensure the quality of education and training in ACT Health. Planned and integrated education is based on the annual learning needs analysis and identified organisational requirements.

ACT Health is a Registered Training Organisation (RTO), which provides a quality framework for delivery of training in line with the Standards for RTO 2015. A Standard Operating Procedure guides the design, development and approval of training programs.

The Education Activity Register (EAR) monitors all programs registered on the learning management system (Capabiliti). In 2014–15, 155 programs were recorded on the EAR.

The EAR ensures programs:

  • are reviewed
  • are evaluated
  • are linked to evidence-based practice
  • involve consumers
  • are updated annually
  • are appropriately authorised.

In 2014–15, key achievements included:

  • establishing partnerships and networks across ACT Health to develop and implement the education required to achieve health accreditation and organisational priorities
  • meeting education reporting requirements for the National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (NSQHSS) accreditation
  • increasing medical officer engagement with essential education
  • successfully implementing a planned process to ensure Visiting Medical Officers (VMOs) meet essential education requirements.

Leadership and culture programs

The ACT Health Leadership Network is composed of approximately 100 employees who have been identified by the executive as leaders and potential leaders who could most benefit from, and contribute to, the network’s objectives.

During the three workshops held in 2014, participants further developed their individual leadership skills. Activities included:

  • presentations from guest speakers
  • examining contemporary leadership research
  • participating in network discussions.

The employees worked in small collaborative groups and formed constructive partnerships across the organisation.

Specific leadership programs were developed and delivered for Canberra Hospital and Health Services and for Strategy and Corporate. These programs involved over 120 staff (executives, senior and middle managers) participating in six to eight days of training in topics such as:

  • leading through vision
  • instilling accountability
  • facilitating effective teamwork.

The People Manager Program (PMP) aims to develop knowledge and skills in people management, and is underpinned by ACT Health’s values. The PMP is for clinicians and non-clinicians in frontline supervisor and middle management positions who have people management responsibilities. It consists of five half-day modules, which were in significant demand in 2014–15. Table 24 shows the attendance figures.

Table 24: Number of Attendances for each module in 2014–15

Module

Number of attendees

Module 1

153

Module 2

151

Module 3

161

Module 4

187

Module 5

151

The ACT Public Service (ACTPS) Performance Framework was supported by the development and delivery of information sessions for all staff and workshops for supervisors and managers. The workshops focused on the practical skills used in performance conversations and on providing feedback, including feedback on conduct and behaviour. There were 656 attendances at all staff information sessions and 545 attendances at supervisor/manager workshops.

Managers and staff were provided with training in managing and preventing bullying, harassment and discrimination. Since the program began in 2011, over 5,200 staff and managers have been trained, which represents over 75 per cent of the workforce. In 2014–15, the Respect@Work refresher training was attended by 172 staff.

The number of Respect, Equity and Diversity (RED) contact officers at 30 June 2015 was 106. RED contact officers include:

  • nurses
  • allied health professionals
  • doctors
  • administrative staff
  • staff who work outside traditional business hours.

Education programs developed in partnership with consumers and consumer groups

In 2014–15, a key initiative was to introduce education programs for ACT Health staff to improve the patient experience by addressing the requirements of the NSQHSS, Standard 2-‘Partnering with Consumers’. All education sessions were delivered to an interprofessional audience. Table 25 provides course details, including attendances.

Table 25: Consumer and consumer group partnered courses

Course

Attendance

Consumer involvement

Introduction to Patient Centred Care

363

Consumer stories were included in presentation

Patient Experience Program

302

Three consumers attended to evaluate program. Consumer stories were included in presentation

Involving Consumers in Quality Improvement Activities

30

Consumers were co-presenters

Patient Centred Care and Shared Decision Making

39

Consumer stories were included in presentation

Writing Consumer Publications e‑learning

88

Reviewed in April 2015

Two consumers provided feedback

Involving Consumers in Education

Professional Development Session for Educators

14

Consumer stories were included in presentation

In early 2015, an audit of the EAR indicated that 47 per cent of education programs involve consumers in planning, delivery or evaluation of education provided to clinical staff.

The consumers in education working group are currently establishing a volunteer program to allow consumers to be involved in education. The working group is also developing:

  • further training in partnership with consumer organisations
  • developing guidelines for educators on how to involve consumers in education programs.

The ACT Health Cultural Competence program

This program aims to enhance ACT Health employee cultural awareness while working with Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) consumers and staff.

The content of the program meets the requirements of Standard 2 of the NSQHSS (2012) and item 1.1.6 of the ACT Health Business Plan 2013 – 2014. Cultural competence has also been recognised as a driving influence towards providing culturally competent care and services to our CALD consumers.

The two hour face-to-face program is being delivered as:

  • a stand-alone session
  • as a part of the Clinical Supervision Support Essentials Program
  • as a part of the TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment.

There were 93 participants at the face-to-face programs. A cultural competence e-learning program was developed in May 2015, which has been completed by 173 staff.

Safety training

A range of targeted health-specific manual tasks programs are provided to meet the safety requirements of various work groups in the clinical and administrative environment. High-risk workers complete annual refreshers.

In 2014–15, 3,511 staff and volunteers completed face-to-face training in manual tasks, an increase of 16 per cent from the previous year. In addition, training was provided to 1,047 tertiary students attending clinical placements. All staff are required to complete a general manual tasks e-learning program on commencement. There were 3,346 completions, a significant increase from the previous year.

Staff also have access to training to assist with managing challenging and aggressive behaviour from clients. The e-learning modules on Personal Aggression and Conflict Awareness were completed by 435 staff. The face-to-face, skills-based Predict, Assess and Respond to Challenging/Aggressive Behaviour (PART) Program or refresher was completed by 234 staff. In 2014–15, extra programs were provided for specialised areas in Mental Health, Justice Health, Alcohol and Drug Division and Health Centres.

Essential education and clinical education


Orientation

The aim of orientation is to ensure all new staff are:

  • welcomed
  • informed of legislative requirements
  • conversant on how ACT Health contributes to the local community
  • aware of requirements of their job role as a public servant
  • aware of their obligation to complete essential education requirements.

In 2014–15, 12 orientation sessions were provided to a total of 1,184 staff and volunteers attending the ACT Health Orientation. An additional 728 staff were deemed to have completed requirements through recognition of prior learning, as approved by their Executive Director. An additional orientation program will be provided in January 2016, which will provide a total of 13 programs annually.

The Workplace Induction Pathway complements the ACT Health Corporate Orientation Program to ensure staff are orientated to their work area and adhere to the responsibilities of their role and work safety. In 2014–15, a total of 3,994 staff completed the Workplace Induction Pathway. An additional 93 staff were deemed to have completed requirements through recognition of prior learning as approved by their Executive Director.

Child protection

Three levels of child protection training are provided to ACT Health staff, depending on their role and the likelihood they will have contact with children and young people as part of their work.

In 2015, additional one hour ‘Q&A’ sessions commenced for the nursing staff at Canberra Hospital and the Health Service Emergency Department. These are facilitated by the child protection training team from the Division of Youth and Children and the Child Protection Liaison Officers. These sessions discuss child protection concerns with staff and provide further advice on reporting and child abuse matters.

ACT Health continues to maintain the partnership with the Community Services Directorate (CSD) in providing the ‘What About Me’ series of workshops for government and non-government organisations. The aim is to increase staff confidence in their ability to work with vulnerable children and families.

Table 26 lists the training courses and identifies the number of participants that attended each.

Table 26: Number of staff who attended Child Protection Training

Child protection training

Participants trained

Level 1 classroom training

142

Level 2 classroom training

905

Level 3 classroom training

482

In-service

15

Level 3 refresher

273

Level 1 e-learning CHHS

1378

Level 2 e-learning CHHS

665

Level 1 e-learning Calvary Bruce

132

Level 2 e-learning Calvary Bruce

204

Level 1 e-learning Calvary John James

419

Level 1 e-learning Calvary John James

215

Total July 2014-June 2015

4668*

Source: ACT Health Capabiliti data

  • Staff may attend more than one level of training, for example Level 1 and Level 3. The participant total reflects the number of attendees at education sessions. These figures include staff from ACT Health, Calvary Bruce and Calvary John James.

Life support programs

ACT Health provides life support training and assessment programs that align with:

  • current National Safety and Quality Standards
  • current Australian Resuscitation Council guidelines
  • the ACT Health Essential Education Policy.

The courses provide staff with the knowledge and skills necessary to effectively manage resuscitation. Table 27 identifies the number of staff who received training in life support programs during 2014–15. It includes all staff trained not just those allocated this training as per the Essential Education Policy.

Table 27: Number of staff who attended life support courses

Life Support Courses

Attendance

Advanced Life Support One Day – 17 programs

147

Advanced Life Support Two Day – 2 programs

31

Advanced Life Support Refresher – 14 programs

154

Basic Life Support

4460

Basic Life Support Train the Trainer – 4 programs

75

Neonatal Advanced Life Support – 11 programs

177

Plus 45 from Calvary

Neonatal Advanced Life Support Refresher – e-learning plus assessment

120

Paediatric Life Support – 5 programs

90

Plus 26 from Calvary and five external participants

Table 29 provides course detailed for new graduate programs.

Table 29: Number of Participants in new graduate programs

Program

No. participants

No disciplines represented

Allied Health New Graduate Program 2014–15

Includes six modules and runs twice a year

35

11

Interprofessional Graduate Program 2014–2015

Conducted 2-3 times per year

155

10

Re-entry Programs for Registered Nurses/Midwives and Overseas-qualified Nurse Programs

The ACT Health Re-entry (Refresher) and Overseas Registered Nurse/Midwife Programs provide educational support to RNs and midwives who have not worked in health care for up to 10 years. The overseas nurses program provides education and support for internationally qualified nurses who are residents in the ACT.

Once participants have successfully completed the program they are eligible to apply for employment with ACT Health. All programs require ACT regional residency as a criteria to apply and are accredited with the Nursing and Midwifery Board of Australia.

The new revised programs in 2015–16 will be developed in partnership with a tertiary provider.

Table 30 provides course details.

Table 30: Number of nurses/midwives and overseas-qualified nurses who have completed, currently enrolled and employed by ACT Health

 

Completed

Currently enrolled

Employed by ACT Health

Registered Nurse re-entry

4

5

2

Midwifery refresher

3

0

1

Overseas qualified

4

3

4

Education for health staff who support, assess and educate others

ACT Health has a suite of programs to provide professional development to staff from all disciplines who are responsible for providing workplace:

  • learning support and education
  • competency assessment
  • student clinical supervision.

These programs support compliance with NSQHSS Standard 1. The standard requires that:

  • competency-based training is provided to clinical staff
  • supervision is provided for individuals to fulfil their designated roles.

Table 31 provides course details.

Table 31: Educational programs provided in 2014–15

Program name

Program description

No. sessions and attendees

Teaching on the run

This program is provided by allied health clinical educators for staff who provide clinical teaching and student supervision.

7 sessions

102 attendees

Supervision for allied health

External clinical supervision training at intermediate/advanced level was conducted for allied health staff by the University of Sydney.

2 sessions

35 attendees

Supervision Allied Health Assistants

Supervision workshops to assist allied health assistants (AHA) and supervisors implement the AHA supervision framework.

3 sessions

39 attendees

Psychology supervision training

Implementation of Psychology Board of Australia approved supervision training to increase student placement capacity.

2 sessions

38 attendees

Clinical Educators Network

This education-focused network meets six times a year and involves clinical educators or primary supervisors from over 25 different allied health professions.

6 session

99 attendees

The Clinical Support and Supervision Program

This two-part program for any clinician who supports or works with new staff, graduates or undergraduate students in the clinical environment. The aim of the program is to provide training for professionals who fulfil a preceptorship or clinical supervision role with students and staff.

103 completed the e-learning

110 attended the one-day workshop

TAE40110 Certificate IV in Training and Assessment

In 2014–2015, the course was revised to offer it in modules so staff can choose to complete relevant units of competency and skills sets rather than the full course. Participants have up to 12 months to complete the modules.

64 enrolments

31 completions of qualification or competency units

Clinical Development Nurse/Midwife Professional Development Program

Clinical Development Nurses and Midwives (CDNMs) are employed by the clinical Divisions to provide workplace learning and support for nursing and midwifery staff.

11 sessions

123 participants

ACT Health Trainers and Educators Network

The Trainers and Educators Network is a forum to discuss best practice in learning and development and to share ideas and initiatives covering issues such as the training design, development and delivery, evaluation and assessment processes, and training management.

Four meetings with 46 staff attending

Scholarships to support further learning for allied health, nursing and midwifery

The Chief Allied Health Office supports ongoing learning and development through the Allied Health Postgraduate Scholarship Scheme. The scheme supports allied health professionals to undertake further learning at postgraduate level in either:

  • clinical practice
  • education and training
  • research
  • management and leadership.

In 2014–15, the Chief Allied Health Office supported 54 individual postgraduate scholarship payments.

The Nursing and Midwifery Office manages a range of scholarships for employed nurses and midwives to support their ongoing learning and education. These include scholarships for:

  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander ENs
  • post-registration
  • travel
  • mental health
  • clinical leadership and management.

Post-registration scholarships continue to support the greatest number of nurses and midwives, with a total of 173 recipients during the 2014 calendar year. This reflects growth of 24 per cent on the 2013 calendar year.

Funding support for between 50 and 100 per cent of course costs is provided. Recipients range from ENs undertaking a Bachelor of Nursing qualification (10 per cent) to RNs studying at graduate certificate/diploma level (49 per cent) and at Masters level (35 per cent).

Student support programs


Postgraduate certificates for act health nurses and midwives

The following postgraduate certificates are offered to nurses and midwives in collaboration with the Australian Catholic University (ACU):

  • Neonatal Nursing
  • Child and Adolescent Health.

The ACU delivers an online component for two units, and educators in the ACT Health Staff Development Unit teach a curriculum approved by the ACU for the remaining two units in each course.

This education model combines theory and experiential learning. The advantages for ACT Health of using this model are that participating staff are well educated for local practice, with their study tailored to work area requirements. ACT Health staff who are students are able to work and study at the same time and do not pay fees for the ACT Health component.

Once postgraduate certificates are completed students have an option to continue and undertake a Masters degree in their speciality.

Table 32 provides course details.

Table 32: Postgraduate certificates

Course

June–December 2014

January–June 2015

Neonatal

Five students with four completing.

Four students with one completing in June.

Child and Adolescent Health (includes either acute paediatrics or a maternal and child health specialty)

Acute paediatrics: Eight students with five completing in December.

 

Child Health: Five students with three completing in December.

Acute paediatrics: Six students with two completing in June.

 

Child and Adolescent: Three students and one continuing online as the course has now ceased.

Masters, Neonatal

Two students continuing.

Four students continuing.

Tertiary students

The Student Clinical Placement Unit coordinates clinical placements for nursing, midwifery, medical and allied health students.

Collaborative partnerships exist between ACT Health and education providers from 36 tertiary and vocational training facilities throughout Australia. A diverse range of placement options are available in ACT Health facilities that provide opportunities for students to integrate theory into clinical practice. Professional development opportunities are also provided in ACT Health facilities for RNs and midwives from regional health services and the Australian Defence Force.

The Student Placement Online (SPO) management system provides a platform for pre-placement preparation, including e-learning programs for legislative compliance before commencing a clinical placement.

In 2014–15, 28,937 clinical placement days were provided to nursing and midwifery students. Night duty clinical placements continued for third year nursing students and again received positive feedback from the students, facilitators and clinicians.

In 2014–15, 10, 327 clinical placement days were provided to local, interstate and international students across the allied health disciplines and medicine.

Work experience in ACT Health for school students

ACT Health provides educational and practical healthcare work experience placements to ACT Year 10, 11 and 12 students in either clinical or non-clinical areas. Availability of placements is the decision of the senior manager of the area requested to provide the placement.

The ACT Health Orientation evaluation asks new staff commencing employment to identify if they were previously a work experience student in ACT Health. In November 2014, the Staff Development Unit began to audit orientation evaluations. Since November 2014, 52 new staff identified that they had previously been a school work experience student in ACT Health.

e-learning

Currently, 70 e-learning courses are available on the learning management system Capabiliti. The courses are available 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

During 2014–15, 17 new courses were implemented on Capabiliti. In addition, 15 courses are under development and review, and a further 14 courses were evaluated and redeveloped.

Table 33, Table 34 and Table 35 provide details.

Table 33: Courses developed and implemented in 2014–15

Courses developed and implemented in 2014–2015

An introduction to Parkinson’s Disease

Ketamine for Acute Pain Management

Aseptic Technique

Medical Officers Noticeboard

Clinical Support and Supervision Essentials

Medication legislation processes

CHARM Documentation Scanning and Importing

Performance Plan Record

COMPASS General Quiz

Performance Plan Review

Cultural Competency

Pressure Injuries

Haemostasis

Records Management

Indwelling Catheter

Screening and assessment of emotional Wellbeing

Intrathecal Epidural Morphine

 

 

Table 34: Courses currently under development and review

Courses currently under development and review

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Awareness

Fire and Emergency

Basic Life Support

Human Rights Act 2011

Child Protection Level 1

Magnetic Resonance Imaging

Child Protection Level 2 – Refresher

Neonatal Resuscitation Update

Essential Finance

Theatre Etiquette

Falls Prevention

Security Awareness

Fluid and Electrolyte

Writing Consumer Publications

Finance Practicalities

 

 

Table 35: Courses evaluated and redeveloped in 2014–15

Courses evaluated and redeveloped 2014–15

ACT Work Health and Safety Act 2011

Medication Package for Orientation

Certificate IV Training and Assessment Module 4

Negligence and Documentation

CVAD Care and Maintenance

Neonatal Resuscitation

Donate Life Designated Officer Training

Personal Safety and Conflict Awareness Module 1

Essential Finance Module 1

Patient ID and Procedure Matching

Ethics, Integrity and Fraud

Privacy and Confidentiality

Infection Prevention and Control, Occupational Medicine and Waste Management

Tobacco Intervention

ACT Health total learning and development activity

Table 36 provides details of learning and development activity for face-to-face programs and completion of e-learning by division during 2014–15.

Table 36: Learning and development activity for face-to-face programs and completion of e-learning by division, 2014–15

Health division

No. of attendances

Hours

Salary

E-learning completed

Canberra Hospital and Health Services

51,950

102,374

4,043,237

37,272

Health Infrastructure and Planning

82

253

13,308

222

Office of the Director General

133

413

18,580

320

Population Health

304

1,524

80,306

554

Special Purpose Account

52

95

4,440

44

Strategy and Corporate

2,872

5,496

240,868

2,026

Other (non-staff on Capabiliti )

NA

NA

NA

984

Calvary*

61

NA

NA

NA

Total

55,454

110,155

$4,400,739

41,422

Notes:

*Calvary hours and salary costs are not available.

An additional 1895 participants attended face-to-face training during the year that do not have profiles on the LMS Capabiliti. Of these, 1163 were tertiary students.

An additional 967 staff were deemed to have completed requirements for some Essential Education programs by Recognition of Prior Learning approved by their Executive Directors.

Future learning and development key priorities

Future learning and development key priorities are:

  • refining and enhancing leadership, management and supervision programs

  • planning and implementing a framework for further engaging medical staff in essential education

  • implementing a new Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Awareness e-learning program

  • updating the Learning Management System, Capabiliti, and incorporating a new electronic version of the Education Activity Register (EAR) in the next 12 months

  • updating education requirements for education on chemotherapy.

Demonstrated commitment to whole-of-government learning and development initiatives

Table 37 shows ACT Health’s participation in whole-of-government learning and development initiatives and ACT Health staff provided with study assistance.

Table 37: ACT Health’s participation in whole-of-government learning and development initiatives

Initiative

No. of participants 2014–2015

ACTPS Graduate Program

6

Activity

No. of participants

Studies Assistance

233

Shared Services Calendar of Training

215

Attraction and Retention Initiatives (ARIns)

Table 38 provides ARIns details.

Table 38: Attraction and Retention Initiatives

Description

No. of individual

(A)

Number of group

(B)

Total employees covered by group

(C)

Total

(A + C)

Number of ARIns at 30 June 2015

18

5

128

146

Number of SEAs that have become ARIns during period

24

5

0

24

Number of ARIns entered into during period

3

0

0

3

Number of ARIns terminated during period*

23

0

0

23

Number of ARIns for privately plated vehicles as at 30 June 2015

1

0

0

1

Notes: 

* The number of ARIns terminated during the period depicts the number of staff who had the payment of an ARIn cease during the period due to resignation, or ineligibility for payment under a group SEA. It does not represent the number of ARIns terminating.

Table 39 provides classification and remuneration rates.

Table 39: Classification and remuneration rates

 

Classification Range

Remuneration as at 30 June 2015

Individual and Group ARIns

DEN1/2, DEN3, DEN4

$54,402–$167,172

 

HPO1-HPO6

$20,273–$162,920

 

PAO3

$120,508

 

SITA - SITB

$134,102–$136,229

 

SOA, SOB, SOC

$88,550–$163,201

Notes: 

This data does not take into account Special Employment Arrangements (SEA) for staff covered by the ACT Public Service Medical Practitioners Enterprise Agreement 2011–13. Staff under this agreement are still paid an SEA not an ARIn.

Our workforce

Table 40 shows Full-time Equivalent (FTE) and headcount by division/branch.

Table 40: 1a. FTE and headcount by division/branch

Division/branch

FTE

Headcount

Canberra Hospital and Health Services

5,212.5

5,999

Health Infrastructure and Planning

47.7

49

Office of the Director-General

101.2

107

Population Health

158.9

173

Special Purpose Account

16.1

21

Strategy and Corporate

659.1

715

Total

6,195.4

7,064

 

Table 41 shows headcount by division/branch and employment type.

Table 41: 1b. Headcount by division/branch and employment type

Division/branch

Permanent

Temporary

Casual

Canberra Hospital and Health Services

4,335

1,363

301

Health Infrastructure and Planning

34

15

0

Office of the Director-General

93

14

0

Population Health

145

27

1

Special Purpose Account

6

13

12

Strategy and Corporate

587

80

48

Total

5,200

1,512

352

 

Table 42 shows FTE and headcount by gender.

Table 42: 2. FTE and headcount by gender

 

Female

Male

Total

Full-Time Equivalent

4,591.1

1,604.3

6,195.4

Headcount

5,340

1,724

7,064

Percentage of workforce (based on headcount)

75.6%

24.4%

100.0%

 

Table 43 shows headcount by classification and gender.

Table 43: 3. Headcount by classification and gender

Classification groups

Female

Male

Total

Administrative Officers

788

187

975

Dental

16

6

22

Executive Officers

13

10

23

General Service Officers and Equivalent

198

297

495

Health Assistants

72

9

81

Health Professional Officers

883

243

1,126

Information Technology Officers

0

2

2

Legal Officers

0

1

1

Medical Officers

421

455

876

Nursing Staff

2,554

330

2,884

Professional Officers

10

6

16

Senior Officers

257

130

387

Teacher

1

0

1

Technical Officers

124

47

171

Trainees and Apprentices

3

1

4

TOTAL

5,340

1,724

7,064

 

Table 44 shows headcount by employment category and gender.

Table 44: 4. Headcount by employment category and gender

Employment category

Female

Male

Total

Casual

258

94

352

Permanent Full-time

2440

975

3,415

Permanent Part-time

1,613

172

1,785

Temporary Full-time

778

433

1,211

Temporary Part-time

251

50

301

TOTAL

5,340

1,724

7,064

 

Table 45 shows headcount by diversity group.

Table 45: 5. Headcount by diversity group

 Diversity group

Headcount

Percentage of agency workforce

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander

79

1.1%

Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD)

1,761

24.9%

People with disability

144

2.0%

Note: Employees may identify with more than one of the diversity groups. 

Table 46 shows headcount by age group and gender.

Table 46: 6a. Headcount by age group and gender

Age group (years)

Female

Male

Total

Under 25

352

109

461

25-34

1,517

529

2,046

35-44

1,287

429

1,716

45-54

1,262

381

1,643

55 and over

922

276

1,198

Table 47 shows the average length of service by gender (headcount).

Table 47: 6b. Average length of service by gender (headcount)

 

Female

Male

Total

Average years of service

7.6

6.4

7.3

 

Table 48 shows headcount by length of service, generation and gender.

Table 48: 6c. Headcount by length of service, generation and gender

Length of service (years)

Pre-Baby Boomers

Baby Boomers

Generation X

Generation Y

Total

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

F

M

0-2

2

2

165

49

347

147

813

348

1,327

546

2-4

2

0

119

34

309

111

482

181

912

326

4-6

2

1

136

36

262

96

292

74

692

207

6-8

2

0

151

54

221

79

182

30

556

163

8-10

4

0

117

36

199

57

86

13

406

106

10-12

3

1

126

36

151

56

46

7

326

100

12-14

0

0

125

34

116

33

20

2

261

69

14 plus

4

5

554

137

293

65

9

0

860

207

Note:

Pre-Baby Boomers cover the years prior to 1946

Baby Boomers cover the years from 1946 to 1964 inclusive

Generation X cover the years from 1965 to 1979 inclusive

Generation Y cover the years from 1980 onwards

Table 49 shows recruitment and separation rates by division.

Table 49: 7 a. Recruitment and separation rates by division

Division

Recruitment rate

Separation rate

Canberra Hospital and Health Services

9.9%

7.0%

Health Infrastructure and Planning

12.0%

18.0%

Office of the Director-General

11.6%

9.3%

Population Health

8.4%

7.7%

Special Purpose Account, Canberra Hospital

22.2%

0.0%

Strategy and Corporate

8.0%

7.3%

Total

9.6%

7.1%

 

Table 50 shows recruitment and separation rates by classification group.

Table 50: 7b. Recruitment and Separation Rates by Classification Group

Classification group

Recruitment rate

Separation rate

Administrative Officers

13.5%

7.0%

Dental

16.3%

8.2%

Executive Officers

0.0%

0.0%

General Service Officers and Equivalent

4.7%

4.7%

Health Assistants

25.1%

11.6%

Health Professional Officers

13.9%

8.8%

Information Technology Officers

0.0%

0.0%

Legal Officers

0.0%

0.0%

Medical Officers

10.9%

4.7%

Nursing Staff

7.6%

7.1%

Professional Officers

0.0%

0.0%

School Leaders

0.0%

0.0%

Senior Officers

5.1%

6.6%

Teacher

0.0%

0.0%

Technical Officers

8.2%

6.0%

Trainees and Apprentices

41.3%

82.5%

Total

9.6%

7.1%